Boeuf Bourguignon and the 50th post!

Boeuf Bourguignon

Photo 2013-04-21 10 52 54 AM

“I cook with wine, sometimes, I even add it to the food I cook” – Julia Child

Hello all!!!

Yeah! I’m still here, and this is my 50th post!!! So much has happen since I started writing this blog, I’ve got a bit lost myself a few time…

When I started this blog, I was really into all kinds of food, but mostly the sweets… then I took a break because of lack of time, made a come back, and took a break because of a change of diet… You might have notice that since the beginning of this year, it has been trending healthier around here… Well, yes, for the benefit of my health (and I reassure you, no big drama health wise, just some re-adjustment to do) I started to see a Naturopathic doctor. That’s the way I’ve been wanted to go for a while, taking care of myself, and my family the simplest and most natural way possible. As my doctor recommended, at least for while, to try to stay away from dairy, grains and sugar, it quickly became evident that a Paleo diet was the way to go. Remember a few posts ago, I was kind of making fun of the Paleo directives in Sugar Free, Butter Free Peanut Butter Muffins. Am I Paleo yet?. Well since, I have research it, and it started to make really a lot of sense, at least for me, to go that route. But of course, I love food, so I will not follow it 100%, unless, really, my health depends on it, and also I have limitation when it comes to make a family dinner that everyone will eat and the cost of eating grass fed meat, and organics, is just not in our budget. But I have learned to make better choices with what I can find around me and it’s working pretty good!

Anyhow, if you are interested in reading more about Paleo, I really recommend scrolling through this web-site, it explains all the guideline and the why of which food is good or bad: http://paleodietlifestyle.com/paleo-101/. Also, it is important to know that it is not a diet to loose weight, but rather to go healthy, which this post explains well: http://stuffyoushould.wordpress.com/2013/04/15/you-should-stop-dieting/. What I like about this way of eating is that it en-lights you on facts that fat and meats are not bad for you if you choose them wisely, but the most important thing is to stay away from processed food, which I can totally deal with!!!

So, Boeuf Bourguignon, is it Paleo? Hey why not, it’s all natural ingredients, and most Paleo dieters will drink wine if they have to choose an alcohol, as it’s not made from grains…

Never made BB? Of course you could go with the Julia Child version, but it is a bit complicated and long for a 1st timer; http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/recipe/julia-childs-beef-bourguignon-8222804. Mine is the same ingredients pretty much, but just easier, which is very much like this recipe found on Epicurious: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Boeuf-Bourguignon-104754.

Because i’m a bit lazy lately about writing, I copied this last recipe for the post, and changed the ingredients to what I have used and a few instructions. But the technique is all the same, and OMG the results!!!

It is a super classic homey comfy stew that everyone loves! Best served on fresh pasta, or with a side of mash potaoes. For Paleo, you could do a celery root mash, or a side of roasted veggies, like those amazing Brussels Spouts I made last time! recipe here: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/roasted-brussels-sprouts-recipe2/index.html, I just added a bit of mash garlic to it 😉

Photo 2013-04-23 10 22 14 PM

 
  • 1/4 pound thick-sliced bacon
  • 3 pounds boneless beef chuck
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour (omit for Paleo or gluten free, or sprinkle a bit of arrowroot starch)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (or more OO for dairy free version)
  • 4 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1 (4-inch) piece of celery
  • 4 fresh parsley stems (no leaves)
  • 4 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 2 bay leaves (not California)
  • 2 cloves
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • 3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 1 (750-ml) bottle dry red wine (preferably Burgundy or Côtes du Rhône)
  • 1 pound small (1 1/2-inch) boiling onions or pearl onions (optional)
  • 1 pound mushrooms, quartered if large

Cook bacon in large heavy pot that can contain the whole stew, then scoop the bacon out onto a paper towel, leaving the fat in the pan.

Pat beef dry and season with salt and pepper. Divide flour and beef between 2 (1-quart) sealable plastic bags, seal, then shake to coat meat.

Add 1‚ tablespoons oil and 1 1/2 tablespoons butter into the pot with bacon fat, over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then brown beef well on all sides in 2 or 3 batches, without crowding, adding remaining ‚ tablespoon oil as needed. Transfer to a bowl.

Pour off any excess oil from pot, then add wine to pot. Deglaze by boiling over high heat 1 minute, stirring and scraping up brown bits, then pour over beef.

Tie celery, parsley, thyme, bay leaves, and cloves together with kitchen string to make a bouquet garni (tuck cloves into celery so they don’t fall out).

Heat 1 tablespoon butter in the same pot over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then sauté chopped onions, garlic, and carrots, then stirring, until onions are pale golden, about 5 minutes. Add remaining wine, stock, meat with juices, and bouquet garni and simmer gently, partially covered, until meat is tender, 3 1/2 to 4 hours. This can be done in a slow cooker, of dutch oven. Check the meat once in while to make sure it’s tender.

Optional: While meat simmers, blanch boiling onions in boiling salted water 1 minute and drain in a colander. Rinse under cold running water, then peel. Heat 1 tablespoon butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saute
 boiling onions, stirring occasionally, until browned in patches. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups water (1 1/2 cups if using pearl onions), then simmer, partially covered, until onions are tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Boil, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced to a glaze, 5 to 10 minutes.

Heat remaining tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until foam subsides, then saute
 mushrooms, stirring, until golden brown and any liquid mushrooms give off is evaporated, about 8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Stir onions and mushrooms into stew and cook 10 minutes. Remove bouquet garni and skim any fat from surface of stew. Season with salt and pepper.

If the sauce is too thin, strained everything out, and place the sauce back on medium high heat and let it reduce to desired consistency (you can add more flour or starch for thickening). Not too much! you want to make sure you have enough sauce remaining!

Cooks’ note:·Boeuf bourguignon may be made 1 day ahead. Cool, uncovered, then chill, covered (it tastes even better made ahead because it gives the flavors time to develop). If making ahead, it’s easier to remove fat from surface after chilling.

Bon appetit!!!!

XOXO – Tartine

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Veal & Carrots Tagine.

Tailgate Chili Con Carne, THE must for your Super Bowl Party!!!

Ham and Cheese Soufflé, with foolproof tips!

 

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Tailgate Chili Con Carne, THE must for your Super Bowl Party!!!

Tailgate Chili Con Carne

Tailgate Chili Con Carne - Tartine & Maple

What best than a good heart warming Chili to serve at your Super Bowl party? It’s easy, yummy, can be prepared in advance and left in the pot all day long, and honestly, who doesn’t like Chili? Plus it’s gluten free, dairy free and you can easily make it vegetarian or vegan!

1st a little bit of food fact about Chili Con Carne, did you know that this is a purely fabricated American dish? NONO, it’s not Mexican! Thank you Wikipedia…

In Spanish, the “chili” refers to a chile pepper and “carne” means meat.

The recipe used by American frontier settlers consisted of dried beef, suet, dried chili peppers and salt, which were pounded together, formed into bricks and left to dry, which could then be boiled in pots on the trail.

The San Antonio Chili Stand, in operation at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, helped people from other parts of the country taste and appreciate chili. San Antonio was a significant tourist destination and helped Texas-style chili con carne spread throughout the South and West. Chili con carne is the official dish of the U.S. state of Texas as designated by the House Concurrent Resolution Number 18 of the 65th Texas Legislature during its regular session in 1977.

 

I started with a recipe from the web a while ago, and slowly customized it. My favorite meat blend is beef and lamb! You can also substitute meat with roasted veggies (carrots, zucchini, eggplants…). Here is my ingredients list; you know what to do next…

You don’t? Well pretty much, just brown the meat in a large pot on medium high, remove the extra fat, add all the other ingredients in the order below, while keeping the pot on medium low (keep corn last) and simmer for at least 2 hours, low and covered. You can also put everything (after browning the meat) in a slow cooker on low for 4 to 6 hours. I like to prepare my Chili the day before, leave it the slow cooker turned off overnight, and next day, turn the slow cooker back on, on low setting while serving; double cooked is always best for dishes like meat stew and Chili, plus the slow cooker keeps it warm while serving! Serve with sour cream, shredded cheddar cheese and bread slices!

If not hosting a big party, you can freeze in portions. It holds very well in the freezer for at least 3 months, and you’ll always have some on hand!

Continue reading

Slow cooker cilantro lime chicken

This time I would love to share with you guys a recipe that I tried this past week-end, from this great blog I started following: Pip & Ebby. I found their recipe for the slow cooker cilantro lime chicken on Pinterest. I love Pinterest, I created so many boards of food that I want to try!

The recipe caught my eyes, because the chicken on the picture looks so tender and moist! I have had a slow cooker for a while and rarely use it. Plus I’ve been getting bored with chicken lately! It happens, I just kind of push an ingredient to the side for a while, but rarely for too long, just need something new to mix it up with, and that recipe is exactly what I needed!

I was so busy on Sunday, that it was the perfect recipe for me to do. So simple, just throw 5 ingredients in your cooker, with no prep work, and, 6 hours later: Tada!!! Plus, there is no fat in the cooking process! That doesn’t mean that you can’t add a little cheddar or sour cream on top   🙂  (done, it was delicious, totally Tex-Mex style!). The only thing I did differently was to drain the juices at the end of the cooking, and reducing it to make a thicker, more concentrated sauce.

I will definitely do it again, next time, if I have more time, with home made tortillas!

Picture is from Pip & Ebby’s blog (mine was not so presentable…)

Pip & Ebby – Pip & Ebby – Slow cooker cilantro lime chicken.